Anarchaeopertyx Takes Flight

Anarchy every day

anarcho-queer:

angry-hippo:

Lolita Lebron (1919-2010) was an anti-imperialist, feminist, and socialist who advocated for an independent Puerto Rico. In 1954 she entered the United States House of Representatives with other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns after yelling, ”¡Viva Puerto Rico Libre!" Five lawmakers were injured in the attack although Lebron herself only fired shots at the ceiling. From prison she became a symbol of hope and strength for many young revolutionaries, and is often cited as an influence of feminist militants from the 1960s and beyond.

The attack on the House of Representatives was in response to the bombing of Puerto Rico by American forces.
On October 30th, 1950, Puerto Rican Nationalists began an armed uprising and declared the island independent from America,
President Harry S. Truman declared martial law and ordered the U.S. Army and Air Force to attack the town of Jayuya and Utuado with bomber planes, land-based artillery, mortar fire, and grenades in the attack, destroying 70% of the town of Jayuya and even riddling school buildings with bullet holes. People were shot in the streets by police and Guardsmen as they walked about or attempted to get away.
It was the first time America bombed it’s citizens since the Civil War. 
The U.S. government carefully restricted the news from reaching America. President Truman dismissed the battle as an “incident between Puerto Ricans.”

anarcho-queer:

angry-hippo:

Lolita Lebron (1919-2010) was an anti-imperialist, feminist, and socialist who advocated for an independent Puerto Rico. In 1954 she entered the United States House of Representatives with other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns after yelling, ¡Viva Puerto Rico Libre!" Five lawmakers were injured in the attack although Lebron herself only fired shots at the ceiling. From prison she became a symbol of hope and strength for many young revolutionaries, and is often cited as an influence of feminist militants from the 1960s and beyond.

The attack on the House of Representatives was in response to the bombing of Puerto Rico by American forces.

On October 30th, 1950, Puerto Rican Nationalists began an armed uprising and declared the island independent from America,

President Harry S. Truman declared martial law and ordered the U.S. Army and Air Force to attack the town of Jayuya and Utuado with bomber planes, land-based artillery, mortar fire, and grenades in the attack, destroying 70% of the town of Jayuya and even riddling school buildings with bullet holes. People were shot in the streets by police and Guardsmen as they walked about or attempted to get away.

It was the first time America bombed it’s citizens since the Civil War.

The U.S. government carefully restricted the news from reaching America. President Truman dismissed the battle as an “incident between Puerto Ricans.”

““The real damage is done by those millions who want to ‘survive.’ The honest men who just want to be left in peace. Those who don’t want their little lives disturbed by anything bigger than themselves. Those with no sides and no causes. Those who won’t take measure of their own strength, for fear of antagonizing their own weakness. Those who don’t like to make waves—or enemies. Those for whom freedom, honour, truth, and principles are only literature. Those who live small, mate small, die small. It’s the reductionist approach to life: if you keep it small, you’ll keep it under control. If you don’t make any noise, the bogeyman won’t find you. But it’s all an illusion, because they die too, those people who roll up their spirits into tiny little balls so as to be safe. Safe?! From what? Life is always on the edge of death; narrow streets lead to the same place as wide avenues, and a little candle burns itself out just like a flaming torch does. I choose my own way to burn.”
― Sophie Scholl”

anarcho-queer:

whereangelsfear:

Milicianas at the Madrid front, Autumn 1936.
(via Nick Lloyd)
You can download a free article by Lisa Lines on the Milicianas here Liam-Bob say check it out.

Spanish Anarchists from the Mujeres Libres organization.

anarcho-queer:

whereangelsfear:

Milicianas at the Madrid front, Autumn 1936.

(via Nick Lloyd)

You can download a free article by Lisa Lines on the Milicianas here Liam-Bob say check it out.

Spanish Anarchists from the Mujeres Libres organization.

(Source: humoristics, via zenarchism)

“The natural outcome of a free and competitive market, when it comes to the fruits of technological progress, is communism. Competition causes the productivity and efficiency benefits of new technology to be socialized in the form of imploding consumer prices and shortened work weeks. Artificial property rights in ideas, on the other hand, enable corporations and plutocrats to enclose these benefits as a private source of rents. And artificial property rights in land and natural resources — like, for example, the Enclosures in Britain 250 years ago — close off competing opportunities for self-employment and comfortable subsistence and leave people with no alternative but to compete for the dwindling supply of jobs that is left.”

anarcho-queer:

Federal Agents Confiscate Cell Phone Surveillance Records From Florida Police To Prevent ACLU Review
The US Marshals Services has intervened in a dispute between a Florida police department and the ACLU, with the Marshals sweeping in at the last minute to seize controversial cell phone records before the ACLU was able to review them.
Earlier this year the Florida chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against the Sarasota Police Department in an attempt to compel them to turn over records on the police’s use of its “Stingray” devices.
The powerful Stingray equipment has drawn the ire of civil liberties advocates nervous about its ability to essentially act as a fake cell tower and collects information from each of phone that connects to it.
The ACLU, which asserts that the Stingray enables the “electronic equivalent of dragnet ‘general searches’ prohibited by the Fourth Amendment,” convinced the court to force the Sarasota police to make the documents available for review.
ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed told Wired that the US Marshals sent an agent from the Tampa area to Sarasota to pick up the documents so the police would be unable to disclose them.
Wessler described the incident as “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the ACLU has seen regarding use of the Stingray.
“This is consistent with what we’ve seen around the country with federal agencies trying to meddle with public requests for Stingray information,” he said, adding that officials have used the Homeland Security Act in the past to keep the documents under lock and key. “The feds are working very hard to block any release of this information to the public.”

anarcho-queer:

Federal Agents Confiscate Cell Phone Surveillance Records From Florida Police To Prevent ACLU Review

The US Marshals Services has intervened in a dispute between a Florida police department and the ACLU, with the Marshals sweeping in at the last minute to seize controversial cell phone records before the ACLU was able to review them.

Earlier this year the Florida chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against the Sarasota Police Department in an attempt to compel them to turn over records on the police’s use of its “Stingray” devices.

The powerful Stingray equipment has drawn the ire of civil liberties advocates nervous about its ability to essentially act as a fake cell tower and collects information from each of phone that connects to it.

The ACLU, which asserts that the Stingray enables the “electronic equivalent of dragnet ‘general searches’ prohibited by the Fourth Amendment,” convinced the court to force the Sarasota police to make the documents available for review.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed told Wired that the US Marshals sent an agent from the Tampa area to Sarasota to pick up the documents so the police would be unable to disclose them.

Wessler described the incident as “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the ACLU has seen regarding use of the Stingray.

This is consistent with what we’ve seen around the country with federal agencies trying to meddle with public requests for Stingray information,” he said, adding that officials have used the Homeland Security Act in the past to keep the documents under lock and key. “The feds are working very hard to block any release of this information to the public.